CJUA 

23 Kilmer Dr, Suite C
Morganville, NJ 07751

ph: 732-972-9000
fax: 732-972-0966

Kidney and Bladder Stones


Kidney stones are extraordinarily common.  Up to 15% of people may develop a kidney stone at some point during their lifetime.  There are numerous types of kidney stones, the majority of which are calcium based.  All stones, regardless of type or content, have a common cause.  Micro-crystals are present in urine normally.  However, when these micro-crystals become very concentrated (urine is supersaturated with crystals), some of these crystals dissolve out of solution and aggregate to become stones.  This cycle, typically associated with episodes of dehydration, usually happens numerous times until a kidney stone is formed.  Once a kidney stone is formed, it is rarely dissolvable with medications or dietary modifications.  Symptoms include flank or back pain, blood in the urine, nausea and vomiting, pain in the groin/vagina/penis, frequent and/or urgent urination, burning when you urinate and sometimes fevers.  The treatment of kidney stones has dramatically improved over the last 20 years with the improvement in technology.  Years ago, the majority of patients that could not pass a stone spontaneously had to undergo major surgery.  Today, there are multiple treatment options that are routinely preformed as an outpatient (the patient goes home the same day as surgery).
Additionally, all patients that form more than one kidney stone should undergo a thorough metabolic evaluation.  With this evaluation, a personalized regimen is discussed with the patient to help prevent future kidney stones from forming. 

Bladder stones are much less common than kidney stones in the present day.  Throughout history however, bladder stones were the most common stones in the urinary tract.  Now with improved nutrition, appropriate treatment of urinary tract infections and management of benign prostatic enlargement, bladder stones are uncommon.  If someone is found to have bladder stones, this is typically a late finding of significant bladder dysfunction.  Usually minimally invasive surgery will be appropriate, but occasionally open surgery is required.

 

 

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23 Kilmer Dr, Suite C
Morganville, NJ 07751

ph: 732-972-9000
fax: 732-972-0966